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Main Office Number: 857-990-8549 or 857-237-8276
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(Founder & Executive Producer)

Steven Provost

This person is essentially the group leader and is responsible for managing the production from start to finish. The producer develops the project from the initial idea, makes sure the script is finalized, arranges the financing and manages the production team that makes the film.

The producer also coordinates the film making process to ensure that everyone involved in the project is working on schedule and on budget. Without the producer at the helm, films do not get made.

Telephone:857-990-8549
Email: Executive Producer


Director

The director is primarily responsible for overseeing the shooting and assembly of a film or video. While the director might be compared to a novel’s author as a film’s primary visionary, he or she would not be able to make the film without the help of numerous other artists and technicians.

In fact, the notion of the director as an author is misleading because it assumes the director, like an author, does everything. A director works at the center of film production, but is inextricably linked with dozens of other people who get the job done together.

Michael Austin

Telephone:857-237-8276

Email: Michel Austin


Field Reporter

Empty

Telephone: Coming Soon

Email: Coming Soon


(Production Assistant)

William Merry

Telephone: Coming Soon

Email: Coming Soon


(Audio Engineer)

Empty

Telephone: Coming Soon

Email: Coming Soon


 (Video Grip)

 


Assistant Camera Operator


Boom Camera Operator


Production Designer

Before one inch of film is shot, the production designer is the first artist to translate the script into visual form. He or she creates a series of storyboards that serve as the film’s first draft.

A storyboard is a series of sketches on panels that shows the visual progression of the story from one scene to the next. Creating this sketch of the film on storyboards also ensures the visual continuity of the film from start to finish. Storyboards serve as the director’s visual guide throughout the production and will be a template to follow during the editing process.


Costume Designer

Costumes convey a great deal about the film’s time period and the characters who wear them, including their economic status, occupation and attitude toward themselves. Be sure to think about how costuming can show something about the character visually.


Director

Mike Austin

The director is primarily responsible for overseeing the shooting and assembly of a film. While the director might be compared to a novel’s author as a film’s primary visionary, he or she would not be able to make the film without the help of numerous other artists and technicians.

In fact, the notion of the director as an author is misleading because it assumes the director, like an author, does everything. A director works at the center of film production, but is inextricably linked with dozens of other people who get the job done together.


Screenwriter

While the dialogue in a film may seem natural to the viewer, a writer carefully crafts it; however, the screenwriter does far more than provide dialogue for the actors. He or she also shapes the sequence of events in a film to ensure that one scene transitions to the next so that the story will unfold logically and in an interesting way.

Like the producer, the screenwriter’s role is generally overlooked by the movie-going public, yet is essential to the completion of any film. If there is no script, there is no movie.


Screenwriter

While the dialogue in a film may seem natural to the viewer, a writer carefully crafts it; however, the screenwriter does far more than provide dialogue for the actors. He or she also shapes the sequence of events in a film to ensure that one scene transitions to the next so that the story will unfold logically and in an interesting way.

Like the producer, the screenwriter’s role is generally overlooked by the movie-going public, yet is essential to the completion of any film. If there is no script, there is no movie.






Art Director

The art director is responsible for the film’s settings: the buildings, landscapes and interiors that provide the physical context for the characters. This person is responsible for acquiring props, decorating sets and making the setting believable.


Cinematographer

The director of photography, or DP, is responsible for capturing the script on film or video. The DP must pay attention to lighting and the camera’s technical capabilities.

When the director wants a shot to achieve certain visual or atmospheric qualities, the DP achieves it through his or her choice of lighting, film stock and careful manipulation of the camera. This craft is referred to as cinematography.


Editor

Shortly after shooting begins, the editor begins to organize the footage and arranges individual shots into one continuous sequence. Even in a single scene, dozens of different shots have to be chosen and assembled from hundreds of feet of film. The editor’s choices about which shots to use, and the order in which to place them, have a profound effect on the appearance of the final film.


Actors

Responsible for portraying the characters in a film, actors work closely with the director and cinematographer. Considering an actor’s role within this larger context also suggests that his or her job is much more difficult than just appearing on the set and reciting lines.


Music Supervisor

Music has been an integral part of movies since cinema’s earliest days in the 1890s. A piano or organ player accompanied even the simplest silent films. The silent movie palaces of the 1920s were equipped with elaborate organs and orchestra pits to accommodate large groups of live musicians. Today selecting just the right music for the film will intensify the story for the audience.


Best Person (formerly known as Best Boy)

Gaffers and Key Grips each may utilize a Best Person, who serves as second in command for their department, coordinating personnel and equipment.